SLD Blog

Silence and Solitude: An Introduction

We are living in a driven age and society. We are known by what we have accomplished and produced. This mindset has found its way into the church and is a hallmark of The Salvation Army.   Being known as the “action arm of the church” is an honored position to be in and is an important role that God has called us to, but we must constantly check how healthy and full our source is from which we draw to continue this kind of ministry.

One way to make sure we are ministering from (and living in) a healthy place is through the spiritual discipline of silence and solitude. Simply put, silence and solitude is a segment of intentional quiet time to be alone with God. In the modern era, this just might be the first step to a life well lived.

Simply put, silence and solitude is a segment of intentional quiet time to be alone with God. In the modern era, this just might be the first step to a life well lived.

Certainly your soul resonates with the benefits of such a practice because we are wired for intimate relationship with Christ, but you may be feeling some resistance as you list the obstacles in your life that make the rhythm seem impossible to realize. This has been every person’s battle throughout the centuries and there are many spiritual greats, with Jesus as our greatest example, who have lived spiritually profound lives that have incorporated this discipline with victory over the push back from the world around them.

So…where are you when it comes to this sacred rhythm? Where would you like to be? Maybe the greatest question is, “Where is God calling you in this area of your life”?   This Silence and Solitude Series will delve into solid foundations from scripture, practical applications and positive experiences. We will discuss history and legacy of this discipline and invite you to accept the Lord’s invitation to whatever the next step of silence and solitude looks like in your life.

“We enter into silence and solitude on the basis of our desire for God, and it becomes a place for being with our desire in God’s presence. Even if we also experience some resistance (which is quite normal, especially in the beginning), when the desire is deep enough to overcome our resistance, we are on our way. The most essential question in solitude is ‘How have I been wanting to be with God, and how has God been wanting to be with me?’” Ruth Haley Barton

 

Written by Major Lauren Hodgson of the Spiritual Life Development Department

To read more posts in this series click here

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